Orpheus & Eurydice: Stephen Fry and James Conlon In Conversation on March 25

JUST ANNOUNCED:

Stephen Fry — English actor, screenwriter, author, playwright, journalist, poet, comedian, television presenter, and film director — will join Maestro James Conlon for a conversation about the Orpheus & Eurydice myth throughout literature and music.

The conversation is free to anyone who attends the matinee performance on Sunday, March 25 and will take place directly after the performance.

If you need tickets for the performance, click here.

Need a quick brush-up on Orpheus & Eurydice throughout history? We’ve rounded up a few places you may have seen the myth besides on our stage. Who know, maybe you can impress Fry with your knowledge?!

The Sandman: Fables and Reflections

Comic book fan? Maybe you’re familiar with Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman: Fables and Reflections, the sixth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. This edition includes The Song of Orpheus, and is a central story of the collection with Gaiman adding his own interpretation of the characters.

Don’t Look Back (She & Him Song) 

Comic books not quite you’re thing, more of a music fan? Zooey Deschanel’s band She & Him released a song in 2008 also based on the Orpheus & Eurydice myth called “Don’t Look Back.” While Deschanel croons not to look back throughout the catchy tune, the song directly mentions Orpheus with the line: “Orpheus melted the heart of Persephone/
But I never had yours.”

She & Him isn’t the only band to use the famous couple as inspiration, Arcade Fire also mentions the famed tale in their songs “Awful Sound (Oh Eurydice)” and “It’s Never Over (Oh Orpheus).”

Orpheus Descending

Playwright Tennessee Williams also tried his hand at telling the ages-old myth with his play Orpheus Descending. Released in the 1950s, the play enjoyed modest Broadway success before closing its short run and being revived in the ’80s.

A screen adaptation starring Marlon Brando was also released in the ’50s under the title The Fugitive Kind, though it also wasn’t successful.

While this list could go on for ages, we’ll let Stephen Fry and Maestro Conlon tell you more about the myth after you see yet another adaptation of Orpheus & Eurydice in the form of our opera featuring The Joffrey Ballet. And with Fry’s new book Mythos, his unique retelling of the Greek myths, having been published in November 2017, we can’t wait to hear this conversation.

 

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One Response to Orpheus & Eurydice: Stephen Fry and James Conlon In Conversation on March 25

  1. The Opera was really enhanced with the Joffrey Ballet dancing. It was a beautiful performance those by singers and the Joffrey.

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