Tag Archives: Opera

7 LA Opera Stage Costumes You Could Totally Wear To Comic-Con

Are you heading down to San Diego for Comic-Con and looking for something to wear? Here’s a list of opera costumes that will leave you Comic-Con ready.

1. This costume from Grendel looks straight out of Game of Thrones.

Jay Hunter Morris as Unferth in Grendel (2006)

Jay Hunter Morris as Unferth in Grendel (2006)

2. Armored soldiers from Aida — who’s to say these aren’t right out of Game of Thrones or Outlander?

Aida (2005); Photo: Robert Millard

Aida (2005); Photo: Robert Millard

3. Any of the Pagliacci clowns — whether you’re dressing as a riff on the Joker or Harley Quinn from Suicide Squad, or a classic homage to Killer Klowns From Outer Space everyone (meaning no one) loves a creepy clown.

Georgie Gagnidze as Tonio in Pagliacci (2015); Photo: Craig T. Mathew

Georgie Gagnidze as Tonio in Pagliacci (2015); Photo: Craig T. Mathew

… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know? | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 7 LA Opera Stage Costumes You Could Totally Wear To Comic-Con

What do Burning Man and LA Opera have in common?

What do Burning Man and LA Opera have in common?

Anabel Romero.

Anabel Romero

Anabel Romero

Romero is LA Opera’s Community Engagement Coordinator. She helps oversee the company’s Opera Camp and Cathedral Project programs that share opera with the Greater Los Angeles community.

When she’s not leading campers or community members in opera productions at LA Opera, Romero is a co-founder and co-artistic director of aLma.MaddR, a Los Angeles-based interdisciplinary arts collective. The collective’s latest project is a sound installation for an international collaboration called Aluna that will be staged at this year’s Burning Man.

These two gigs aren’t mutually exclusive.

Romero shares that one actually informs the other in the way she makes art. Her community outreach work has helped Romero understand how to use art to connect diverse communities.
… Continue reading

Posted in Faces of the Opera | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The Internship of a Lifetime

LA Opera establishes six-year paid internship

Robert Rivera and Maya Ordoñez after meeting with LA Opera's Chief Financial Officer Faith Raiguel

Robert Rivera and Maya Ordoñez after meeting with LA Opera’s Chief Financial Officer Faith Raiguel

When most people think of interns, they think of enthusiastic college juniors and seniors experiencing the office environment for the first time before being thrust into the workforce. At LA Opera, we do hire college interns – but we also hire high school interns through an innovative new program meant to forge the next generation of diverse arts leaders: LA Opera Leadership Academy.

LA Opera Leadership Academy is not your ordinary internship.

Why? It can last six years.
… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know? | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

WATCH: Christopher Koelsch Talks Bringing New Audiences To LA Opera

Christopher Koeslch (left), Graham Parker (center), Yael Greenberg (right)

Christopher Koeslch (left), Graham Parker (center), Yael Greenberg (right)

LA Opera President and CEO Christopher Koelsch participated in discussions at the inaugural Classical Evolution/Revolution Conference about how companies can find and keep new audiences for music.

The panel also included Yael Greenberg, Music Consultant, Kickstarter, and was moderated by Graham Parker, President of Universal Music Classics, USA.

… Continue reading

Posted in Opera About Town | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

How To Get Your Opera Fix This Summer

LA Opera’s 16/17 season is almost over. But, you don’t have to wait until September (and the opening of Carmen on September 9th). Here are a few ways to get your opera fix this summer.

Hear LA Opera’s Artists Around Town

Matthew Aucoin (right) works with Summer Hassan, a member of the Domingo-Colburn-Stein Young Artist Program

Matthew Aucoin (right) works with Summer Hassan, a member of the Domingo-Colburn-Stein Young Artist Program


Mozart: Truth Through Beauty
LA Opera’s artist-in-residence Matthew Aucoin, joined by the rising stars of the company’s Domingo-Colburn-Stein Young Artist program, presents a musical exploration of Mozart’s unique artistic trajectory.

… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know?, Opera About Town | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Girl Power Playlist

Sondra Radvanovsky as the title character in Tosca (2013); Photo: Robert Millard

Sondra Radvanovsky as the title character in Tosca (2013); Photo: Robert Millard

Opera has some of the gutsiest heroines that you don’t want to mess with who have killer arias –anthems as empowering awe-inspiring as your favorite Beyoncé, Alicia Keys, and Katy Perry songs.

Before seeing our upcoming production of Tosca –whose title character is one gutsy heroine – check out our list of music that gets you in that girl power spirit.

Tosca’s Act III aria (“Il tuo sangue o il mio amore”) – Tosca by Giacomo Puccini (opens at LA Opera on April 22)

Tosca will do anything for Cavaradossi, the man she loves – even resort to murder. In Act III, Tosca tells Cavaradossi exactly what she had to do to save his life. It’s one of the most climactic moments in the opera and showcases just how gutsy Tosca can be.

… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know? | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Girl Power Playlist

What Is It? Objects That Help Make Opera Magic.

The Tales of Hoffmann (2002); Photo: Robert Millard

The Tales of Hoffmann (2002); Photo: Robert Millard

Have you ever wondered – “How’d they do that?” Opera brings stories to life, and the magic you see on stage is often the result of incredible ingenuity on the part of our behind-the-scenes artisans. We’ve rounded up a few of our favorite objects used in productions—old and new, both onstage and off—to give you a glimpse at what’s involved in staging the operas you love.

Can you guess what these objects are for? (The answers are below, but no cheating!)

Torch

  1. The torches we use onstage have a name that references a crucial safety feature. What are these props called?
  2. Butane-Bufer
  3. Dead Man’s Torch
  4. Burnless Bunsen
  5. Touchable Torch

… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know? | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

3 Things Opera and the Olympics Have in Common

Back in 1984, Los Angeles hosted the Olympics Arts Festival. During the Los Angeles Olympics, the Opera Association co-produced three operas with London’s Royal Opera (Turandot, starring Domingo as Calaf, as well as Peter Grimes and The Magic Flute), which not only helped establish the city as an international arts destination, but also helped raise funds for the soon-to-rise opera company.

So, you could say, LA Opera was born out of the Olympics.

We’re thinking about this history as we prepare to watch tonight’s opening ceremony for the Rio Olympics. But, we’re also thinking of some of the things opera and the Olympics have in common.

Opera Singers

The 1984 Olympics is not the only time that opera and the Olympics have collided. Throughout the years, many famous opera singers have sung at various summer and winter olympics, including Plácido Domingo. Remember when he sang alongside Song Zuying in Beijing in 2008?

Plácido Domingo and Song Zuying at the Beijing Olympics (2008)

Plácido Domingo and Song Zuying at the Beijing Olympics (2008)

… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know? | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on 3 Things Opera and the Olympics Have in Common

Want to win an exclusive LA Opera backstage experience?

What do you love lead image

What do you love about opera in Los Angeles? If you’re reading this, you’ve probably seen an opera. Whether it’s been at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion or about town, we want to share your love of it with new fans. What is it about operas in Los Angeles that you love? Is it the film-inspired opera productions, or even the various locations you can go to see an opera?

… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know? | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Want to win an exclusive LA Opera backstage experience?

Opera’s not for me…or is it?

Walk into a room and mention you’re heading to the opera. I bet you’ll get some confused looks and head scratching. For me, the response is typically, “You – an opera fan?” So try it and don’t be surprised if you hear some of these.

But you don’t look like an opera fan, what gives?

What does an opera fan look like? I thought I knew, but when I look around the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion (LA Opera’s home) during a performance, I see all sorts of people. Parents with their teenagers, hipsters on first dates, girlfriends on outings, couples young and old on a regular night out, groups celebrating special milestones, others dressed in costumes to emulate the production. You name it; you’ll see it in the theater and on the red carpet out front.

Faces of the Opera

… Continue reading

Posted in Did You Know? | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Everything You’ve Ever Wanted To Know About La Bohème

Share There are three chances left to see La Bohème at LA Opera. This Belle Époque set production has wowed audiences with its doomed love story beautifully sung by Nino Machaidze and Olga Busuioc and Mario Chang and rivetingly conducted … Continue reading

Posted in About Our Shows, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Everything You’ve Ever Wanted To Know About La Bohème

Why I Give: Summer Walters

Summer Walters attending a performance at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

Summer Walters attending a performance at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

Summer Walters wears a special outfit each time she attends an LA Opera production and shares pictures on Facebook. “My friends see the excitement that envelops me in each photo, so I have introduced quite a few friends to the world [of opera] that I hold so dear,” explains Ms. Walters. “Each time I attend with someone who has never experienced opera, it’s like watching the performance through the wide-eyed wonder of a child. It makes my heart so happy.”

… Continue reading

Posted in Faces of the Opera | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Why I Give: Summer Walters

Guess The 2016/2017 Season!

Are you excited to find out what we have in store for our 2016/2017 season? We can’t wait to tell you! That’s why this week, we’re giving you some clues. Get in on the fun and guess what will be on our mainstage in the coming season, which starts this fall.

Just how well do you know opera? (And if you don’t, now’s the time to get excited.) There are two ways that you can guess the 16/17 season this week. Here they are.

Let’s Talk About Icons

Each day this week, we will release an image of an object that symbolizes of one of the operas in the coming season. We’ll roll them out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest and they’ll also be added to this post.

Comment below or on any of our “How Well Do You Know Opera” social media posts and guess which production the icon is from. If you guess right, you will be entered to win a special prize.

But that’s not all! All winners will be entered to win a GRAND PRIZE – two tickets to the Plácido Domingo and Renée Fleming concert on March 18.

Let the guessing games begin! In what opera might you see this?

Object #1

Guess The Season 1

Object #2

crown macbeth

Object #3

sand-dune

Object #4

moon

Object #5

luggage

Object #6

tosca brushes … Continue reading

Posted in About Our Shows, Word Wednesday | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

The Staging of an Opera Company: The Hemmings Era Begins

When the LA Opera first presented Rigoletto in 1993, David Young was the second chair bass player in the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the ensemble that played for most performances during the company’s early years. The opera features a prominent solo for the double bass—at the fateful moment when the troubled jester first encounters the assassin Sparafucile—which went to LACO’s longtime principal bassist, Susan Ranney. But by 2000, when the company next offered Rigoletto, Young had become the principal bassist for the LA Opera Orchestra, and it was finally his moment to shine after years of waiting for that rare opportunity. He asked Peter Hemmings, who would soon retire as LA Opera’s general director, if a promotional poster had been made for the production, explaining how much it meant to him. “Of course,” replied Hemmings. “I’ll get you one.”

Peter Hemmings; Photo: Ken Howard

Peter Hemmings; Photo: Ken Howard

Hemmings delivered the poster a few days later. Not only was it signed “Best wishes, Peter Hemmings,” it also boasted the signatures of the major stars in the cast. That framed treasure hangs on the wall of Young’s studio today. Hemmings passed away two years later, making his thoughtfulness especially poignant to Young. “Peter Hemmings really cared about everybody,” he says. “He loved this company and he gave his all to our founding years.”

Young’s story is indicative of the atmosphere that Hemmings fostered, with artists, administrators, staff and volunteers all working in close collaboration toward a common goal. Fondly remembered for his warmth, British wit and jovial nature, Hemmings was also greatly respected for his high expectations, imagination and loyalty. With a background that included bringing the Scottish Opera to prominence, he was more than up to the challenge of building a massive opera company—virtually overnight.

… Continue reading

Posted in LAO 30 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Staging of an Opera Company: The Hemmings Era Begins

The Month of the American Composer

Composer of Operas

Jake Heggie

When most people think of October, visions of fall and Halloween come to mind. Here at LA Opera, this October has been “The Month of the American Composer.” Three of our events involved some of the most important American composers of our age – Missy Mazzoli, Philip Glass, and Jake Heggie – working at the height of their powers. To celebrate how vital opera is to our nation culturally, we’ve curated a few articles below where you can learn more about each composer and listen to some of their masterful music.

Jake Heggie, The Man Behind Moby-Dick

Composer Jake Heggie Brings Moby-Dick to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion – via Los Angeles Magazine

Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, the classic tale of one man’s pursuit of an elusive white whale, has over the years been turned into films and television miniseries. Now, it has been turned into an opera. Jake Heggie, whose Dead Man Walking was performed earlier this year at the Broad Stage, is the composer of the show, which opens Saturday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.

Jake Heggie On Why Opera Is Here To Stay – via Los Angeles Times

Don’t tell Jake Heggie that opera is a dying art form. The composer of the opera Dead Man Walking “thinks it’s alive and kicking — he even uses an unprintable term to describe a recent batch of articles declaring that “Opera is dead.” And while his passionate words in defense of the operatic form are convincing, the trajectory of his own career is perhaps his best argument.

Music Monday: Moby-Dick Overture – via LA Opera Blog

This weekend, Moby-Dick opens at LA Opera. Melville’s tale of obsession, the nature of good and evil, and the search for the elusive, titular, white whale is set to an evocative score by famed American composer, Jake Heggie (Dead Man Walking). When Heggie describes tackling the mammoth tale, he speaks of finally finding the music of Moby’s universe in four simple chords. These chords capture the spirit and yearning inherent in Melville’s story and resurface throughout the rest of the score, in a haunting fashion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cd-Z4-3Ip_Q

 For tickets to Moby-Dick, click here.  … Continue reading

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Faces of the Opera | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Month of the American Composer

James Conlon Invites You To Moby-Dick

Jay Hunter Morris as Captain Ahab in Moby-Dick (2015); Photo: Craig T. Mathew

Jay Hunter Morris as Captain Ahab in Moby-Dick (2015); Photo: Craig T. Mathew

Maestro Conlon is very excited about conducting the upcoming production, Moby-Dick, opening October 31st. Check out why he loves Jake Heggie’s opera and why he thinks you should see it too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPXajVAABvw

Moby-Dick is a classic American tale that’s wonderful to experience live. Yet, to enjoy Moby-Dick fully, take a look behind-the-scenes to see how the production has come together.

… Continue reading

Posted in About Our Shows, Videos | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on James Conlon Invites You To Moby-Dick

Opera: A Community Treasure

Today, National Opera Week kicks off. Running through November 1, National Opera Week is a great opportunity to celebrate opera’s positive impact on communities around the country (and to a larger extent, the world). This got us thinking. What are some of the ways that opera influences community?

It brings us together.

Craig 2

Guests enjoy Gianni Schicchi (2015) at Opera at the Beach

Putting together an operatic production is a feat of epic proportions. Since opera is an amalgamation of several art forms, various artists (singers, designers, writers, even filmmakers) join together for one singular purpose: to bring a story to life.

Yet, opera brings not only artists together. Opera is for all those willing to experience timeless stories, staged theatrically, and sung by the most engaging voices of our time. This can mean a night out in Downtown Los Angeles at the Dorothy Chandler or a date night at Santa Monica Pier for a live HD simulcast at Opera at the Beach.

It educates us about history, society, social responsibility, and just about anything else you can imagine.

 The cast of Nixon in China (1990); Photo Credit: Frederic Ohringer

The cast of Nixon in China (1990)

Did you know that there’s an opera about Richard Nixon called Nixon in China? Several operas are based on Shakespeare plays and Greek myths that tackle the big themes: love, humanity’s purpose, revenge. There are even short operas based on themes of social responsibility that form the crux of our Opera Camp program. Operas make people think in different ways; they can teach us to see the world through a new lens.

… Continue reading

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Did You Know? | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Opera: A Community Treasure

Moby-Dick: No Book Report Required

A timeless classic, Moby Dick sits atop just about every literary reading list. You’ve heard of it, you’ve probably read it and if you have a high school freshman, like I do, it’s on their reading list right now.

And as said freshman pointed out, the book is big – really big.

On October 31, Moby Dickthe opera – opens at LA Opera.While reading the novel can seem daunting due to the sheer volume of details, the opera brings the story to life. We’d never recommend you see the opera instead of reading the novel – it’s not a substitute or the Cliffs notes version or anything – but, the opera provides you with a rich and vibrant telling that’s pretty close to the big book. (It really is the perfect way to get the would-be reader excited about the classic tale.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cd-Z4-3Ip_Q

… Continue reading

Posted in About Our Shows | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Moby-Dick: No Book Report Required

Missy’s Song from the Uproar

Abigail Fischer as Isabelle Eberhardt in Song from the Uproar (2015); Photo Credit: James Matthew Daniel

Abigail Fischer as Isabelle Eberhardt in Song from the Uproar (2015); Photo Credit: James Matthew Daniel

“A nomad I will remain for life, in love with distant and unchartered places.” – Isabelle Eberhardt

In May 1897, an adventurous Swiss woman named Isabelle Eberhardt relocated to North Africa. There she went down a path of self-discovery very atypical for a woman of her time. Eberhardt lived her life to the fullest. She reveled in her time alone experiencing the desert just as much as she adored discussing Islam with members of the Sufi order she joined called Qadiriyaa.

Missy Mazzoli (right) with Director Gia Forakis (center) and singer Abigail Fischer (left)

Missy Mazzoli (right) with Director Gia Forakis (center) and singer Abigail Fischer (left)

Eberhardt also romanced and eventually married an Algerian soldier with whom she had a sometimes tender, sometimes tumultuous relationship. Tragically, her extraordinary life ended at the age of 27 when a flash flood roared through the Algerian province of Aïn Séfra. Yet, elements of Isabelle’s life have been immortalized in the words of her journals, which were published posthumously.

Eleven years ago, composer Missy Mazzoli picked up a copy of Isabelle’s journals in a Boston bookstore and read the following passage:

“On days when I have no money, I am a vagabond on the road, enjoying the reflections of gold and scarlet sunset on the white dunes. The grave alone can rob me of such wealth, not man. If I am allowed the time it takes to write the odd fragment of a description, it may even survive the minds of some.”

Eberhardt’s words stopped Mazzoli in her tracks and “haunted her for years.” This Thursday, Mazzoli’s Song from the Uproar has its west coast premiere, brought to Los Angeles through a partnership between LA Opera and producer Beth Morrison Projects.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4P2pH3qhYpM

… Continue reading

Posted in About Our Shows, Opera About Town | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Missy’s Song from the Uproar

Greg Fedderly: 63 Productions, 390 Performances, and Counting

LA Opera is a family company. Nowhere is this more evident than in the returning singers that spend long stretches of their career gracing the stage at Dorothy Chandler. Greg Fedderly is the epitome of these singers. Throughout the course of LA Opera’s history, Fedderly has been in 63 productions – that’s over 390 performances in 30 years (and counting). This includes Borsa in Rigoletto (1993, 2010), Monostatos in The Magic Flute (1992, 2002, 2009), Red Whiskers in Billy Budd (2014), and many, many more.

Greg Fedderly

Greg Fedderly in his dressing room before portraying Gherardo in Gianni Schicchi (2015)

… Continue reading

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Faces of the Opera | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Greg Fedderly: 63 Productions, 390 Performances, and Counting