Tag Archives: Anatomy Theater

Everything You’ve Ever Wanted To Know About anatomy theater

Robert Osborne as Baron Peel in a 2016 workshop of David Lang's Anatomy Theater; Photo: James Daniel

Robert Osborne as Baron Peel in a 2016 workshop of David Lang’s anatomy theater; Photo: James Daniel

Last week, David Lang’s anatomy theater had its world premiere at REDCAT as part of LA Opera’s Off Grand series. The grisly and intense work has garnered a great deal of acclaim not only for the edginess of the production (with a staged public execution followed by a dissection), but also for the questions it raises about the nature of evil and where evil truly lives within each of us. If you’ve missed the anatomy theater love these past couple weeks, we’ve collected a bunch of articles and videos for you to get a sense of what makes the show so visceral.

Get To Know anatomy theater

Peabody on Her Most Vulnerable Role Yet

Based on actual 18th-century texts, anatomy theater follows the story of Sarah Osborne, an English murderess, who is tried, executed, and publicly dissected before a paying audience of fascinated onlookers. Gritty, emotional, and inventive, the opera features several villainous characters, but none more vulnerable than Osborne, who is masterfully brought to life (and death) by mezzo-soprano Peabody Southwell.

Robert Osborne Talks anatomy theater

Bass-baritone Robert Osborne is a veteran performer of contemporary opera, known for tackling challenging roles from the title character in Harry Partch’s Oedipus to François Mignon in the Robert Wilson-directed Zinnias. Currently, he performs the role of Baron Peel, the anatomist, in the world premiere of David Lang’s anatomy theater. During rehearsals, we sat down with Osborne to discuss his work in anatomy theater and what makes Baron Peel tick.

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Keith Rainville Brings His Brand of 60s Film Aesthetic to the Opera

Keith Rainville at LA Opera

Keith J. Rainville at LA Opera

For Keith J. Rainville, what began as a two-week graphic design gig at LA Opera (which he took instead of going to San Diego Comic Con) has morphed into a 13-year career as the company’s in house designer and brand manager. Rainville oversees and creates LA Opera’s marketing materials and has been instrumental in crafting the company’s cinematic style—a look often inspired by his lifelong love of classic film, 1960s television shows, and vintage horror.

“I was a kid in 1970s New England,” says Rainville. “We had a good five month winter and since I couldn’t go outside, I spent my days watching TV. Back then, pre-cable, you were a victim of whatever was on. I was lucky to have really good channels out of Boston that syndicated a lot of old 1960s TV shows. As a kid, I never quite understood what was new and what was old. I thought a ten year old rerun of Lost in Space was just as contemporary as Star Wars,” recalls Rainville. He continues, “My earliest memories of connecting with graphic design and typography were credit sequences for shows like Wild, Wild West and Bewitched. It was a great time for those credit sequences, most of which were animated, and I used to love those more than the shows.”

Those early experiences of watching 1960s TV shows, as well as Japanese monster movies, moody black-and-white Universal and later garishly hued Hammer classic horror films, still inspire Rainville to this day, particularly in his marketing designs for LA Opera’s more outré productions. “If you ever want to look at key art and say, ‘That’s a Keith Rainville design,’ look at our Lohengrin, Hercules vs. Vampires, and Nosferatu campaigns,” says Rainville. Those campaigns (see below) are 1960s inspired, full of loud colors, and eye-catching graphics. Of this, Rainville says, “Marketing is a blunt force instrument. You have to grab people’s collars and get their attention, and nothing does that more than garish color and large graphics.”

Key art for Lohengrin (2010) and Nosferatu (2016) designed by

Key art for Lohengrin (2010) and Nosferatu (2016) designed by Keith J. Rainville

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Timur on Ambrose Strang and anatomy theater

Timur

Timur

Kazakh-American tenor Timur has truly made an artistic mark in Los Angeles. Beyond studying at USC and CalArts (where he is now a faculty member), he has made solo appearances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and The Industry. He has also played throughout the city with his glam rock band Timur and the Dime Museum, including premiering a rock opera at REDCAT in 2014. His latest artistic endeavor in the City of Angels is creating the role of Ambrose Strang in David Lang’s anatomy theater. During rehearsals, we sat down with Timur to discuss anatomy theater.

 How did you get involved with anatomy theater?

Last year, I worked with Beth Morrison Projects on several different productions. Beth produced my band’s Collapse: A Post-Ecological Requiem, a piece done in the form of a Catholic mass for the dead. Beth produced it for different festivals, including at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. So, I’ve known Beth for almost three years.

She mentioned anatomy theater and when I found out it is by David Lang—a now legendary composer who is breaking waves in music theater—I just jumped at that opportunity. I am also a big fan of Beth Morrison Projects and to have a partnership element with LA Opera—it’s quite innovative. I didn’t want to miss the chance to be part of it.

A scene from a 2016 workshop of Anatomy Theater; Photo: James Daniel

A scene from a 2016 workshop of anatomy theater; Photo: James Daniel

Tell us about Ambrose Strang. What do you think motivates him?

So Strang is a young assistant to Baron Peel, who is the anatomist, and one can say, also a moral teacher. He’s a mentor to my character Strang, to some extent, and Strang is certainly his admirer and follower. Peel teaches Strang things, while he does all the cuts and the dissections. He outsources all that to my character. To me, Peel represents the current science of the period. In the middle of the opera, Strang has this epiphany that what Peel is saying is not exactly true. From that point on, Strang evolves and realizes that Peel is wrong. Then, Strang finds his own ideas about how the science can change and progress. In a sense, Strang represents the future of what’s going to happen.

The dynamic is very interesting. All the characters in the opera have something they regret, or are ashamed of for different reasons. Strang realizes that maybe we are looking in the wrong place for evil. Strang could be the future of the modern field of psychology, because he suggests that we should look in the soul of the person, which could be an interpretation that maybe there’s something about the mind that is worth exploring.

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Robert Osborne Talks anatomy theater

Robert Osborne as Baron Peel in a 2016 workshop of David Lang's Anatomy Theater; Photo: James Daniel

Robert Osborne as Baron Peel in a 2016 workshop of David Lang’s Anatomy Theater; Photo: James Daniel

Bass-baritone Robert Osborne is a veteran performer of contemporary opera, known for tackling challenging roles from the title character in Harry Partch’s Oedipus to François Mignon in the Robert Wilson-directed Zinnias. Currently, he will debut the role of Baron Peel in the world premiere of David Lang’s anatomy theater. During rehearsals, we sat down with Osborne to discuss his work in anatomy theater and what makes Baron Peel tick.

How did you get involved with anatomy theater?

I joined the cast of anatomy theater in 2006 for a workshop of the piece at MASS MOCA. I am the only cast member from that early workshop, which was also directed by Bob McGrath and Ridge Theater. In the decade since the workshop, I have also done some other work with David Lang, and have been a fan and follower of his music all these years.

To be honest, I am not quite sure why David approached me for the original workshop, except that we were colleagues at the Yale School of Music. I’ve known David since 1980. When this project came around, I knew that he was writing the role of Sarah Osborne, the female character in the show, for a mutual friend of ours (this was before Peabody took on the role this year), and she and I were extremely good friends and performed a lot together. I also have a reputation for being someone who can do and does do a lot of contemporary work and new music, and I know that David has seen me in other productions.

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5 Reasons Why “anatomy theater” Is A Must-See

On June 16, David Lang’s anatomy theater makes its world premiere at REDCAT as part of LA Opera’s Off Grand initiative. This gritty opera tells the story of an 18th-century English murderess and the anatomists, who painstakingly try to discover the root of evil by publically dissecting her body. Composed and co-written by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer David Lang, anatomy theater is an inventive opera experience.

Here are five reasons why anatomy theater is not-to-be-missed.

A scene from a 2016 workshop of Anatomy Theater; Photo: James Daniel

A scene from a 2016 workshop of anatomy theater; Photo: James Daniel

Peabody Southwell. She’s the stunning mezzo-soprano who plays Sarah Osborne, the English murderess. The fantastic thing about her performance is she has to play dead for 50 minutes – while she’s dissected – and she sings while “deceased.” Check out Southwell discussing this feat below.

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Peabody Southwell on her most vulnerable role yet

A scene from a 2016 workshop of anatomy theater; Photo: James Daniel

A scene from a 2016 workshop of anatomy theater; Photo: James Daniel

On June 16, David Lang’s anatomy theater makes its world premiere at REDCAT as part of LA Opera’s Off Grand initiative. Based on actual 18th-century texts, anatomy theater follows the story of Sarah Osborne, an English murderess, who is tried, executed, and publicly dissected before a paying audience of fascinated onlookers. Gritty, emotional, and inventive, the opera features several villainous characters, but none more vulnerable than Osborne, who is masterfully brought to life (and death) by mezzo-soprano, Peabody Southwell.

“On the page, Sarah Osborne could read like a woman who has fallen and become a victim of her society,” says Southwell of her role.

Sarah was born poor, abused by her stepfather and then, because of that, was kicked out of her house by her mother at a young age and forced to make her way on the streets. She became a prostitute, and drank heavily to deal with that lifestyle. She fell in love with her pimp, married him and had two children. After reaching her breaking point, she killed her abusive husband and their children. The opera begins as Sarah is hanged for her crimes.

“What’s interesting to me about anatomy theater is that they refuse to present Sarah as that tragic female archetype” explains Southwell. “Instead they present her as an active villain.”

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What Kind of Opera Valentine Are You?

Rolando Villazón and Anna Netrebko as the tile characters in Romeo et Juliette (2006); Photo: Robert Millard

Rolando Villazón and Anna Netrebko as the title characters in Romeo et Juliette (2006); Photo: Robert Millard

Opera is all about love. Passionate Love. Unrequited Love. Betrayed Love. Desperate Love. You-name-it love. With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, it’s the perfect time to find out what kind of opera valentine you are.

The Storybook Romantic

You’re the kind of person, who appreciates storybook romance, even if it ends in tragedy. For you, it’s all Puccini, Verdi, and Mozart all the time. You can get down with the unrequited romance just as much as you can love the fantastical loves that conquer all.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_B4yKMKmwA

Best Opera Next Up at LAO: Madame Butterfly

Other Operas to Check Out: The Magic Flute, La Boheme, Tosca

The Cinema Siren

You live and breathe film and love it when opera productions are inspired by your favorite movies or film eras (or when films use or are inspired by opera). Operatic love is like a good Classic Hollywood film; whether it ends happily or tragically, the love is always spectacular.

The Magic Flute (2014); Photo: Robert Millard

The Magic Flute (2014); Photo: Robert Millard

Best Opera Next Up at LAO: The Magic Flute

Other Operas to Check Out: La Boheme, Macbeth , Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror

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