Music Monday: Rigoletto

<a href="http://blog.laopera.org/?s=George+Gagnidze&amp;x=0&amp;y=0">George Gagnidze</a> as the title character in <em>Rigoletto</em> (2011); Photo: Robert Millard

George Gagnidze as the title character in Rigoletto (2011); Photo: Robert Millard

“Everyone cried out at the idea of putting a hunchback on the stage; well, there you are. I was very happy to write Rigoletto…and it is my best opera.” – Giuseppe Verdi, July 26, 1852

Giuseppe Verdi’s Rigoletto is Victor Hugo’s play Le roi s’amuse on steroids. Verdi’s music energizes the story’s tragic drama, a father-daughter tale that ends unhappily. In the opera, the title character is a court jester to the womanizing Duke of Mantua, who openly mocks his social superiors in order to please the Duke. One day, he mocks the wrong man – the Count Monterone, whose daughter has been seduced and discarded by the Duke.  The Count warns him never to make light of a father’s grief, a threat which haunts Rigoletto, as he is father to the beautiful Gilda, whom he keeps secluded from eyes of lecherous men like the Duke. When Gilda falls in love with the Duke, Rigoletto decides to have him murdered, but his plans go awry and Gilda ends up dying as a result.

Rigoletto’s most famous aria is the Duke’s Act IV show of callousness in the form of “La donna e mobile” (women are fickle), an unforgettable tune that returns—to heart wrenching effect—at the very end of the opera. The main point of the aria? Women are flighty and untrue, but men still need their love. (Warning: This may change your perspective on your favorite pasta commercial.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlEJxKCnRmg

Plácido Domingo as Rigoletto and Vittorio Grigolo as The Duke

Can’t get enough Verdi? Stay tuned for our Music Mondays for the next few weeks!

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